Tax deductions

Clarinet lessons, lawn care and more: unusual but legitimate tax deductions


(ABC4) – If you’ve been rushing to file your taxes on time for the May 17 deadline – or you’ve been given an extension – you might want to be aware of some unusual tax deductions and credits.

While the tax breaks below may seem unrealistic, they are absolutely legal, according to eFile.com.

Medical fees

Do you have a child taking clarinet lessons? This is a deduction as a medical expense. Clarinet lessons can be used to correct a child’s overbite, according to a 1962 case where an orthodontist argued that playing the instrument could correct the problem.

The costs of your swimming pool can be deducted. If you have a health problem, such as arthritis, and you buy a swimming pool to help relieve your condition, the pool fee could be an approved deduction.

Have you purchased nicotine patches or participated in a quit smoking program? These expenses may give rise to a deduction. This may also be true if you’ve lost weight, if your doctor approves weight loss expenses, and claims that your life could be in danger if you don’t exercise and lose a few pounds.

Pet-related expenses

If you’ve lost your job and move to start a new one, your pets’ moving expenses may be tax deductible. To be eligible, eFile states that you must be an active-duty military member or an employee who reimbursed expenses dated before January 1, 2019 and did not claim them in a previous tax return.

Cat food can be expensive. If, for example, you own a junkyard and put in cat food to attract local stray animals to keep mice and rats away, it can be a business expense.

Other one-off expenses

If you pay someone to babysit your children while you volunteer or do charitable work, you can deduct your child care expenses.

Have you started working from home amid the pandemic? The cost of maintaining your lawn can be deducted if the condition of your lawn has an impact on the performance of your business. For example, if you see clients at your home office, legal costs may be deductible.

You might not have a lawn, but what about a whaler? If you do and needed to repair your boat, you can deduct up to $ 10,000. But, you shouldn’t start a whaling business for delisting, according to eFile, given that the U.S. government has banned whaling and only certain Native American tribes are allowed to engage in it.

For more unique and legitimate tax deductions and exemptions, visit eFile.com.


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